Parasite Herbs
 
Single Herbs
 
 


 

It is recommended that one start just before the full moon and suspend use of these formulas from the new moon to the next full moon. Use may need to be continued for several months.

 

Artemisia Annua Extract, 2 oz.

Artemisia Annua Extract, 2 oz.
Sweet Annie

Artemisia annua, also known as Sweet Annie, is a famous anti-malarial herb that contains an alkaloid, artemisinin, that has also shown remarkable cytotoxic properties. This herb is also available as an alcohol-free glycerite.

Alcohol: 55%

Contents: extract of fresh, organically grown Artemisia annua leaf in distilled water, organic alcohol, and pure vegetable glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Bacopa Extract, 2 oz.
Bacopa monnieri

Bacopa is an aquatic plant and the primary herb in many Ayurvedic formulas used to improve memory and/or concentration. Bacopa has traditionally been regarded as an aid to learning, retention, and clarity. It also has a reputation as the herb of choice for epileptic disorders and is one of the favored herbs for anxiety. Like many rasayana herbs, it is an antioxidant. It is also antiparasitic and improves gastrointestinal health, including ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome. Bacopa is very safe. In Sri Lanka, it is administered to babies from about eight months of age to purify the blood and to clear parasites and eczema.

Alcohol: 39-41%

Contents: 1:1 extract of organically grown Bacopa monnieri in Distilled Water, Organic Alcohol, and Vegetable Glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Black Walnut Extract, 2 oz.

Black Walnut, 2 oz.
Juglans nigra

The Cherokee used the nut as an anthelmintic, especially for tapeworms. Peter Holmes adds roundworms to the list. Black walnut has laxative properties but is well tolerated. It relieves lymphatic congestion, presumably mainly in patients with parasitic infections. It is also antifungal and has naturally occurring iodine in high enough amounts that it can also be used externally as an antiseptic.

Alcohol: 40%

Contents: fresh, organically grown Juglans nigra green hull extract in distilled water and organic grain alcohol.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Boldo Extract

Boldo Extract, 2 oz.
Peumus boldo

Peumus boldo comes from the Chilean Andes and has a marvelous minty aroma. It is a stomachic and digestive aid, particularly beneficial for people with a tendency towards gall stone formation, especially when such conditions give rise to pain. It is also useful for genito-urinary inflammations. In South America, it is regarded as a cure for gonorrhea. Further north, it is considered useful for hepatic congestion and is often used by veterinarians for jaundice. It contains a chemical constituent very similar to chenopodium and is thus often used for intestinal parasites.

Alcohol: 60%

Contents: extract of Peumus boldo leaf in organic grain alcohol, distilled water, and pure vegetable glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Boswellia Serrata Extract, 2 oz.

Boswellia Serrata, 2 oz.
Shallaki

Research in Germany suggests that boswellia reduces edema in the brain. The herb is also an excellent parasiticide and should be considered for those who suspect brain parasites.

This product is made from the resin of an Indian frankincense.

Alcohol: 69-71%

Contents: Organically grown Shallaki resin in certified Organic Grain Alcohol.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Chaparral Leaf Extract, 2 oz.

Chaparral Extract, 2 oz.
Larrea tridentata herb

Other Medical Connections: Cancer researchers first became interested when an 87 year old man cured a facial cancer by consuming chaparral. Scientists at the University of Nevada investigated the activity of NDGA and found that it was a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial enzymes, which in turn inhibits cancer growth. While no clinical data exists to support using chaparral for cancer therapy, thousands of testimonials credit it for tumor remissions and complete cures. Other medical evidence indicates chaparral is an anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial agent and a possible treatment for asthma. Research continues to uncover it's mode of action and other potential therapeutic uses.

Current Status in the Marketplace: After allegations in 1992 of liver toxicity associated with chaparral consumption, manufacturers voluntarily restricted sales until the reports were investigated. Following a lengthy review, a panel of medical experts concluded "no clinical data was found... to indicate chaparral is inherently a hepatic toxin. " In late 1994 this report was submitted to the FDA and the product was subsequently given a clean bill of health by the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA). After comparing the quantity of chaparral consumed each year to the number of product complaints, industry regulators concluded chaparral did not pose a significant threat to consumer safety.

Alcohol: 75%

Contents: extract of leafy tips of Larrea tridentata in distilled water, organic grain alcohol, and pure vegetable glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Extract of Eleuthero Root, formerly called Siberian Ginseng

Eleuthero Root Extract, 2 oz.
Eleutherococcus senticosus

Eleutherococcus senticosus is an adaptogen but not a true ginseng. It is sometimes called pseudo or Siberian ginseng but it is not actually a ginseng. It has blood sugar lowering effects and has been shown to bind estrogen receptors and stimulate T-lymphocyte activity and natural killer cell production. It is normally taken to increase coping margins and stamina, but it sometimes stimulates in a manner that makes it necessary to observe patients with hypertension carefully before using higher than recommended dosages. In China, this herb is taken by those suffering from bone marrow suppression following chemotherapy and radiation.

Alcohol: 40%

Contents: Eleutherococcus senticosus in distilled water, organic grain alcohol, and pure vegetable glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Gotu Kola Extract, 2 oz.
Centella asiatica

Brahmi supports the mind and nervous system, helping to improve memory and sustain intellectual effort. The leaves are considered to be very sattvic, i.e., pure as opposed to dull or stimulating. Gotu kola aids restful sleep and is a natural blood purifier. It was used by Machamuni Siddhar for his kalpa. In a way, brahmi is tridoshic because it reduces excess vata in the mind, is cooling to pitta, and decongesting to kapha.

For pdf on Gotu Kola, click here.

Alcohol: 49-51%

Contents: organically grown Centella asiatica aerial parts in Organic Alcohol, Distilled Water, and Vegetable Glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Myrrh Extract, 2 oz.
Commiphora molmol

Myrrh gum has a long history of use as both a medicine and perfume as well as incense. It is aromatic but intensely bitter. It is used in Chinese medicine to move stagnant blood and is often used for problems associated with menstruation as well as uterine tumors. Its use in Ayurvedic medicine is similar, but it is processed differently. In Western medicine, myrrh is used both internally and externally as an antiseptic. It is used mainly for toothaches and gums in mouthwashes and for wound healing and sprains externally. Studies suggest that it helps to maintain correct blood sugar and cholesterol levels. It is often used in the treatment of arthritis.

Alcohol: 94-96%

Contents: extract of Commiphora molmol oleoresin in organic cane alcohol and distilled water.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

Neem Extract, 2 oz.
Azadirachta indica

Neem is regarded as a potent detoxifier. It has antimicrobial and antifungal effects as well as blood sugar lowering properties. It is also antiparasitic, clearing both the larva and ova.

Alcohol: 44-46%

Contents: 1.5 extract of organically grown Azadirachta indica leaf in Distilled Water, Organic Alcohol, and Vegetable Glycerin.

Sacred Medicine Sanctuary, $

 

 

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Copyright by Sacred Medicine Sanctuary 2014


Images by Ingrid Naiman
Graphic Design: Damien Francoeur

No claim is made for the effectiveness of any formula in treating or curing any disease, and no product or information provided in relationship to any product is intended to replace the advice of qualified health care practitioners. If in doubt about specific needs, please contact your practitioner. None of these products has been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.